About

Paul
Trinity, Alabama

Beginnings

Born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. With my four siblings, I had a good childhood. Our biological father died when I was five years old, and our mother supported us through her work as a seamstress. She remarried when I was twelve. Our stepfather was a miracle. He was caring, loving, and nurturing. He worked hard as a metal worker, and he adored his four step-children, and not once did he raise a hand against any of us.

School life

My public-school life was unremarkable. I do remember though my fifth-grade teacher, Mrs. Boylin. She read to us every day. She read two novels: The Secret Garden and Last of the Mohicans. I loved every second. She firmly believed in my ability to learn. I went straight to the top of her class. I made top grades and I became captain of the baseball team.

In the sixth grade the teacher was determined to show that since I had been raised without a father, how could I be any good? She put me in the “dumb” row. She yelled at me. She spanked me every chance she got. And sure enough, my grades fell. I dropped to substitute player on the baseball team. Finally, I became the dumb child she had predicted. It took many years to recover from that.

College

I lived with my older sister, Mary, during my undergraduate years, at Middle Tennessee State University. We lived in a trailer on a walking horse ranch. College life was dull, but life on the ranch was great–rode horses, attended walking horse shows, groomed and fed horses. On the ranch I had a life. As a college student, I was a deer in the headlights. I had no clue. I was on academic probation for the first two years. If I flunked out, like all other young men, I’d be instantly drafted and sent to Vietnam. It was a good motivation to stay in school. I wasn’t anti-war, but I sure as hell didn’t want to get killed either. I lost several good friends in that war. By hook or crook I managed to stay in school.

First Job: Pubic school English teacher in Georgia

This one year, 1970, was living hell. I was not prepared to teach in rural Alabama where most white children hated most black children who had come into their schools via forced integration.  And they all seemed to hate me, the teacher. The governor of Alabama at that time was Lester Maddox. The last two months of that job, I started the day drinking Malox straight from the bottle, like liquor. That was breakfast. By the end of the year, I had enough motivation to go back to college. I did. I earned my Master’s in English by 1972 and found a job as an English Instructor at Alcorn State University, ASU.  Note: Alcorn is pronounced: All-corn, as in al-ways.

Career

I taught at ASU, an HBCU (Historically Black College/University) for thirty-seven years. For twelve of those years, I served as Chairperson of the English and Foreign Languages Department. I loved my job. I loved teaching. Even now I remember how I always looked forward to that “first day” of class when I would meet my new students. As any teacher will tell you, each class has a distinct personality. I have always felt that teaching has kept me young…well, young in spirit! But, I have always felt myself to be one of the lucky ones who managed to grab hold of a career and hang on to it.

When I started work at Alcorn, October, 1972, I felt as if I had landed in paradise. I was teaching at an institution of higher learning. When I began teaching, Alcorn’s student population was ninety-nine percent African American. After a year of shedding southern white folks mythic notions of black folks, I settled in. I lived on campus, most people did in those days. In the seventies, I had a wonderful time. I taught classes, graded papers, held long conferences, sponsored the department English club, and after hours, there were football games, parties, jazz, blues, trips to New Orleans, beer, dope–it was the life I had missed.

I grew up at Alcorn. I read African American literature. Literature that in some cases, I didn’t even know existed. I listened to older African Americans talk about their lives in the fifties. America wasn’t great at all. I made life-long friends–one man in particular, a black man, Newtie Boyd. He has since died. Education was his life. He ferried kids back and forth to school from his home town, Morton Mississippi. He kept them in school. He genuinely cared. He and I were close friends. It was said by faculty that Paul Broome and Newtie Boyd prove that white and black men can be brothers. I keep that remark close to my heart.

The Final Degree

In the eighties, I got caught up with marriage, children, job, and eventually divorce and financial disaster! During the nineties, I went back to school on a faculty grant to earn my PhD in literature and theory from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. There I worked with so many wonderful people such as my dissertation director Karen Dandurand, a truly great woman and scholar, and Patrick Murphy, the professor who patiently pulled me through literary theory. Interestingly enough, it was during this time that my creative writing life exploded with activity. I think it’s mainly because I’ve never cared that much for academic research. I know. I know. There were moments when writing literary research that I became excited and all of that, but my great love was fiction. While at IUP, I wrote story after story. I read them at coffee houses, literary gatherings, parties. It was wonderful.

Retirement, Marriage, and Japan

Since life on earth didn’t end with the millennium, I kept writing. My career started winding down, and my writing life began. By the time I retired from Alcorn, I was serving as Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs—that’s code for “do everything the Vice President doesn’t want to do.” In 2012, I moved to Alabama and married a lovely Japanese woman. I’m currently trying to master Japanese. I will say this: writing is easier. We have visited Japan six times since we’ve married. My wife’s mother lives in Osaka. Essentially, I want to learn Japanese so that I can hold a modicum of conversation with people I meet and especially with my Japanese mother-in-law who is a most fascinating woman. She is eighty-three years old and gets about like a teenager! Currently she is engaged in her own project of riding every train in Japan. How amazing is that?

Sadako, my wife, and I plan to go to Japan in September 2017. Not only is the country lovely, but the people are patient, kind, and gentle. Most everything about Japan appeals to me. Here’s one example: One evening Sadako, her mother, and I were returning from a late evening meal at an Italian Restaurant in Osaka. It was around 10:30 at night. We had to walk a mile or so back to her mother’s apartment. I’m talking inner-city here. Half way there we passed several children playing on the sidewalk, laughing and talking. Once we got to the apartment, I realized I had witnessed what to me was a miracle. In a modern city of 10 million, second or third largest in Japan, children can play outside at 10:30 at night! Here in Decatur, a city less than a quarter of a million, parents won’t even let their kids go trick or treating without adult supervision.

In Japan, guns are outlawed. It’s that simple. The number of homicides in Birmingham, Alabama, in one month, outnumbers the homicides in all of Japan in one year. I’m not a gun lover. I don’t condemn those who do love firearms. But I must say, the force of the reality that I was walking in a gun-free society was stunning. It still is. And that realization helps me with my self-definition, as well as, my self-cultural definition. Who am I as a human and who am I as an American. It’s something to write about.

Writing

During my tenure at Alcorn, I wrote plays in the seventies and had a few of them produced on the university stage. Eventually I gave up playwriting as the medium of creative expression and turned to fiction. I love poetry but I’ve never thought of myself as a poet. In the late seventies, I attended a writers’ workshop at Bennington College, and there met John Gardner and Bernard Malamud. I had work sessions with novelists, Nick Delbanco and Frederick Busch, both of whom were wonderful writers and teachers. The Bennington experience did not translate into book sales or publications, but it was a turning point in my writing life.

I’ve published one story thus far. “Walter Lee Comes Home from Vietnam.” It was published in “The Sun Magazine” in 2013. Since then I’ve piled up a ton of rejections, but I’m still happily at it. I’ve got stories in the drawer…who doesn’t, right? I’ve got one completed novel, needing deep revision, and half novel, waiting patiently, and I’m currently two-thirds through a novel. I try to wake up around four or four-thirty every morning to write. It’s a good time for me-so quiet. I can write steadily for an hour or hour and a half, then have breakfast with my wife, Sadako. Once she’s off to work, I walk Cody, our black lab, then back to writing for maybe another hour or so. During the day, I might take notes or jot something down, but essentially most writing is done during the morning.

Reading

All my life I’ve been a heavy reader. I read tons of Asian poetry with an emphasis on Tang Dynasty poets of China. Poet Du Fu is my absolute favorite. I have read everything written by the Japanese novelist Yasunari Kawabata. His novel, The Sound of the Mountain, is, so far as I’m concerned, one of the greatest novels ever penned. I wrote my dissertation on Anthony Trollope and must say I still love his novels…all 47 of them! I’m a big fan of the Victorians. George Eliot is at the top of the list. I enjoy nineteenth century international writers. Tolstoy, Chekhov, Flaubert, Balzac. I’m a lover of the classics, but I try to keep up with current fiction. This past year a few favorites were: P. Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train, M. Zusak’s The Book Thief, and A. S. King’s Ask the Passengers.

Movies

I enjoy movies, especially International movies. Technology has been a godsend in this arena. In the seventies and eighties, if you wanted to see a movie from Europe or Asia then, you had to travel to New York City to do so. Now, you can stream movies in through your computer. It’s wonderful. The most amazing thing though—I’m beginning to find it difficult to find the time to sit in front of a screen for a two or three-hours. I’d rather be reading or writing.

Photography

I came to photography late. My faculty gave me a camera as a parting gift. It was a huge surprise, and it started my love for nature photography. I lived in the country in Mississippi…deer in the front yard and all that…it was nice. I also had a pond so there were wood mallards, herons, hawks, owls–my life as a nature photographer was on its way. Nature has taught me patience.

Miscellaneous

Hmmm, I am a moderate drinker. I love to sit out on the patio late at night with a bottle of sake or wine or both and the temperature around 65 to 55, and with a log fire in the fire pit, and watch the moon rise from behind the trees. I’m also a part-time woodworker. My skill is scroll sawing. I’m also a part-time gardener. I try to plant two to three trees a year. I love trees.

Favorite Season

Autumn is my favorite season. With the temp between 50 and 65 degrees, I feel as if I can sit out on the back porch and write forever. With the temp between 30 and 49, I can sit inside by the gas log fire and write and write and write. Yes, I’d love to have a “real” fireplace, but what can I say. We’re out in the country but it’s a modern house. Nevertheless, I’m insanely happy and fortunate so I ain’t complainin’.

Thank you for reading and please visit any blog post that catches your fancy!

58 thoughts on “About

    1. paulabroome427 Post author

      Why thank you so much Anna! What a wonderful person you are. And let me just say that I absolutely enjoy your haikus and longer poems. The ones that I click “like” on are my favs. I think you must be a very strong person, but of course vulnerable. And that’s one reason you write. Life is hard Anna, so hard, and yet, here we are. Waking up each morning, drinking our coffee, dragging ourselves to the computer, to the writing pad, to the whatever and beginning another day. I read your poetry every day…so know that there’s a guy in Alabama who definitely enjoys your work. You are an incredible woman and a very good poet.
      Oh, I checked out your “About” page, and I watched the memorial video on your sister Sarah. It was very moving.

      Thank you again for nominating me for the Sunshine Blogger Award! I’m gonna hold on that for awhile. Not decline, but hold! 🙂 Please don’t be upset with me. I just don’t have that many followers. I’m the new kid on the block and so I want to get a bit more material under my belt so to speak. But thank you truly.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      1. agrishaw

        Thank you so much for such a kind and thoughtful reply. 🙂 I’m glad that you enjoy my writing that means so much to me that you read my posts every day! 🙂 I’m also touched that you watched the memorial video about Sarah. I also think your posts are very thoughtful I enjoy reading them!

        Take your time responding to the Sunshine Blogger Nomination. I look forward to seeing your answers 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    1. paulabroome427 Post author

      They say that learning a new language strengthens the brain! Gaaa, I should be Einstein by now! Japanese is tough. There are three alphabets: hiragana, katakana, and kanji. I’ve mastered hiragana which means I can read I can read the names of towns which are always written in hiragana at the train stations in Japan. I’m working, slowly, on katakana which is a separate alphabet for words that are not of Japanese origin…are you yawning? THEN one must learn kanji which are the Chinese characters, you know those really complicated looking things that are cool to have on a t-shirt… There’s about ten thousand of those. My wife says I only need to learn a thousand or so…oh…okay.
      I’m using Rosetta Stone. It’s good, but you really have to keep at it. My goal is to be able to at least carry on some modicum of conversation with the folks I meet when we go to Japan. We go at least once a year. By the way, if you haven’t yet–please put Japan on your list of places to go. My pitiful advice? Book a room in a really nice hotel in Kyoto, and walk from there. And go in May…cherry blossom time. It is perfectly lovely…and after two glasses of sake you’re in heaven! Thanks for the comment. I apologize for such a sad “about.” I need to beef it up a bit. So thank you so much.

      Liked by 4 people

      Reply
      1. whimsical90

        Wow! that is a lot of information in one comment…firstly, I didn’t yawn once…infact I find it very inspiring that you are taking all the trouble to learn Japanese…I have been willing to learn French since quite some time. I need to act on it now. Your struggle helps :). I hope you do master the other two, katakana and kanji.
        And sure, I’ll make a note. Japan-Kyoto-May-Walk. Thanks for all the information about you Paul(is it?). Very interesting indeed. I am Roopam by the way.

        Liked by 3 people

  1. Madeeha

    Thank you so much for visiting my blog and giving me a chance to visit your’s. I’m glad to discover your blog and I like reading the details about you. Love for Asian poetry and your passion for learning Japanese inspire me. I’ve no doubt that you’re a talented writer.
    Really glad to discover this space on wordpress 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  2. ladycee

    Hi fellow newbie blogger!
    I dropped by to say hello because I see you’ve followed me.
    You seem to have led a very full, interesting life and it sounds as if you’ve found much of it fulfilling. That is a precious thing. Glad your 2nd marriage is working out well. Your mother-in-law sounds an amazing woman. All the best with learning Japanese and with your writing endeavours.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
  3. Hemangini

    Your introduction is wonderful and so informative. You taught English to kids for 37 years that is massive achievement. I have deep respect for people who love what they do. Your work instantly speaks for you. Look forward to reading more from you.

    PS. I love that now you are retired and living in countryside. I have deep love for countrysides and someday I want to live there too.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. paulabroome427 Post author

      Well thank you so much. I loved my job, and I realized many times over how fortunate I was to have a career that made me as happy as teaching did. Of course there were difficult times, but that’s a part of every career package.

      I am a country boy at heart. I love to hear birds. I love to watch the rain, which it is now doing. My dog Cody is on the couch…his favorite spot…snoring. Very happy. And so am I.

      thank you and I hope you find your small and cozy home in the countryside. I think you will.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. paulabroome427 Post author

        Yes, I’m still at it. Arrigato! It’s a very difficult task, but I figure I have the time so why not. My goal is to be able to have a modicum of a conversation with Japanese people when my wife and I visit. I’ve met so many wonderful and interesting people, but I always have to rely on my dear wife to translate. Soooo, I keep at it and maybe some day I’ll be able to talk to that cheerful Japanese person that I meet on the road, or the restaurant, or on the train. Ah Hemangini, there’s so much beauty in this world, so much so much. When I go to Japan, I feel so often, surrounded by the sheer loveliness of space, time, and people. Learning Japanese is tough, but I do have time on my side! 🙂

        Like

  4. Cynthia Guenther Richardson

    What a wonderful story you shared of your life and the love of teaching and writing, among other subjects. You appear to be at peace with your life and full of joy–such gifts! Thank you for reading my own stories;I will certainly read more of your offerings. Best regards to you and yours, Paul, and may your life continue to bloom with delights.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Shadrack Agaki

      Paula from Nairobi Kenya, I want to thank you for following my blog. I have gone through your about page,reading through the introduction i am amazed with your accomplishment. Retired professor, married to a Japanese already learning Japanese Language.coupling all that with writing. That sound fantastic.However, i have also seen in one of your comment, you have said that you don’t have many followers and that seem to concern you; but i have followed you because i really value experience and love to read other people’s stories for they give me a picture of what the world is. Soon i assure you, you will have a multitude of followers who world want to tap from your experience just like i want to.

      As you progress in the journey of sharing your stories and creativity with the world, Just know that many would support you and would be willing to learn from you. That is what i will do; trying to learn from you as much as i can.
      Cheers

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. Karina Pinella

    What a pleasure to meet you. Thanks for visiting and clicking follow. I’ll be very happy to support you and follow too. I found when I started my blog that it’s a hit or miss. Some people carry over their followers from other social media, while others got the attention of a really popular blogger who happened to endorse a post or two and boom. Then there are others who post and build up a following steadily. So, as long as you follow your own writing inclinations rather than trying to write for such a random and subjective audience, I believe you will find blogging pleasurable. Have fun and see ya ’round the blog!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. paulabroome427 Post author

      Dear Peaches
      To follow my site just click on my icon to the left of this comment and a “follow” sign should appear right below the comment. Click the word “follow” and it should turn into “following.” Then you’ll get all my posts. Yeaaa! 🙂

      And thank you so much for your wonderful words. Oh, I LOVE retirement. It’s great. I mean it. A lot of folks warned me…”Oh, you’ll get bored. There’s nothing to do! It’s lonely.” All of that is B.S. I read, I write, I walk my crazy black lab Cody, I do the blogging, my wife and I travel…it’s great. So again thanks. And I’m glad to have met you!

      Like

      Reply
  6. calmkate

    Most informative and such a fascinating life Paul. One of my dear friends fathers married a delightful Japanese lady after he was widowed and he also loved visiting her country! As an artist it added a new dimension to his work, sadly she died of a heart attack but he is in close contact with her adult daughters. How can I find your published article about Vietnam? I worked with vets for years so have a genuine interest, thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      Well thank you. Oh I love Japan. We are headed there this November for the fall foliage in Kyoto. Sadako’s mother lives in Osaka so we spend a lot of time with her. She turns 83 this month and still gets around better than I do! We always have such a great time.

      My publication was a work of fiction, and it only addresses the Vietnam veteran issue indirectly. But, if you wish to take a peek, you can go to The Sun Magazine.com and then click on “Magazine,” then “Back Issues.” Next go to the 2013 year and find the June Issue. You’ll see my story listed: “Walter Lee Is Home From Vietnam.”

      You’ll be able to read roughly the first third of my story, but to read the rest you’ll have to subscribe…sorry.
      Still, thank you so much for reading and responding. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  7. Bea dM

    This looks like a rare, thoughtful blog, so I’ll be dropping in. There’s so much substance I’ll have to do it when I can take a good break from busy-ness! And thanks for following mine 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  8. totoryan

    hello again Paul! wow, teaching for 37 years… I really admire that. I have always had a secret ambission to teach, and my friends said I was good in explaining things informally, which is why I have no confidence (yet) to teach anything in a formal environment.
    I’m looking forward to reading your posts 😀
    Douzo yoroshiku onegaishimasu.
    m(_ _)m

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      Arrigato!
      Yeah 37 years! OMG! And as I think I said, I truly loved my teaching career. You know what, for me, was the greatest perk? It was the beginning of each semester. The Fall started in late August, and the Spring semester started in January. The most wonderful moment was watching a new class file into the room. It was always a sense of a new beginning. Who were these students? Would they be a great class? Would they be responsive? There was always a sense of excitement. Oh, there were definitely some disappointments! 🙂 But still the next semester I would have the same feeling again.

      Thank you thank you, for the great response. I look forward to your blog. I’m off to study my Japanese!

      Like

      Reply
  9. M. Miles

    Paul, I’m preparing a blog post with a panel of 4-5 writers. I will provide 5 quotes from famous authors with a couple of questions related to each quote. I’m looking for thoughtful writers/bloggers to respond, and I would love to bring you on board! I know the holidays are a hectic time for everyone, so I don’t plan on publishing this post until mid-January. Would you be interested?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  10. Pingback: Mystery Blog Tag From Simon | Fabulous With Glitches

    1. Paul Post author

      Well thank you so much, Anisha. I’m on your “About” page now, and I’m really quite impressed. You have moved yourself in the right direction. Good for you! I really mean that. This world is a hard world, but for a woman it is much more difficult to maintain independence than it is for men. I believe that “old soul” of yours has a lot of strength. 🙂

      I’ve lived most of my life alone and how wonderful that has been. Even now I’m happily married–in part because I know and value being my own person. I think it makes one more human. Ironic I suppose, but I believe it’s true. So I understand your life style and agree. Reading a book can often be so much more fun than a loud party. :-). Good for you!

      Again thanks a ton for the interest. I’m gonna head over to your blog now and read the poem “Red” again. It’s very good!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Anisha

        Thanks a lot Paul for dropping by…and yes you are right about the marriage part as well…independence and co-existence both have their own charms… 🙂 and thanks about the poem…glad you liked it enough to read it again 🙂 🙂 see you around!

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Idle Muser

    I always had a special bond with my school’s English teachers (which I guess I had three from my 8th grade to 12th). The kind of rapport that I used to develop with them, instantaneously, never got me into thinking. But now when I look back, I realize that maybe it was the subject of English that lead into creation of the bond. 🙂
    So, Paul, you being an English teacher was one of the reasons I chose to follow you after going through few of your posts.Learning about writing and reading is my favorite part off the day and I am looking forward to learn more from you. 🙂
    Good Day, Paul! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      Well thank you so much! I feel honored and happy to know you. Your writing certainly reflects excellent English skills. I look forward to your posts as well. Thanks again Aditi.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Idle Muser

        Here, you said it again. It would really be my honour to have your feedback (including constructive criticism☺️) on my write-ups.🙂
        I am overwhelmed (now, I don’t want to sound overwhelmingly emotional, so I won’t say more), but thanks a lot for checking my blog out.😊

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Miss Gentileschi

    Your “About” page is one of the best I´ve come across so far! I´m glad you visited my blog so I could stumble over yours. A friend of mine is just in the process to move to Japan (Okinawa) and I already look forward to visit her someday. I´ve always been very fascinated by the Japanese culture but still need to see it all with my own eyes. I like that you´re learning Japanese now, it´s quite tough I imagine. I´m struggling with French at the moment 😉 Happy writing! Best wishes, Sarah

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      Thank you so much. And good to hear that you’re studying French. the good news about French is they use the same alphabet as we do. 🙂 I’ve learned one of the three alphabets used in Japanese language. Whoa! In one sense it’s fascinating. In the other…it’s horrendous! But, that’s okay. Hey it keeps me busy. :-). Thanks again Sarah, and great to hear from you!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Miss Gentileschi

        That´s exactly the reason why I chose it 😉 But to be honest, I´m not afraid of strange letters – I learned Ancient Greek at school 😉
        I tried to learn Mandarin a couple of years ago but it really is a tough one, I will stay with the indo-european languages for now. Does your wife teach you Japanese or do your visit classes?
        There´s nothing better for our brains than to learn something new 🙂
        Have a lovely day! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Paul Post author

        How right you are! Ancient Greek! I’m jealous. I have wanted to learn that for some years and it’s the next challenge after Japanese.
        I use Rosetta Stone and my wife is my
        strict facilitator! :-). for which I’m very grateful. She explains so much. For instance, how one word changes when it’s thrown together with another…gaaaa. And she helps with pronunciation. The Japanese “tsu” sound bite is actually, for me, a challenge. She has me repeat it over and over…until. I finally get it. Whew!
        And you are right. One of the best ways to. keep the ol brain muscles strong is to learn a language. Thank you for the great support and I hope your day is a great one! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Miss Gentileschi

        Ancient Greek is a wonderful language – reading Homer´s Odyssee in the original is just priceless. 🙂
        I´m glad your wife is so patient with correcting your pronunciation – it can be quite devastating when your teacher looses it and makes you feel stupid instead (this is what happened to me when I gave it a go with Mandarin 😉 ).
        Luckily my French accent seems to be much better 😉
        Wish you a wonderful week and lots of fun with the “tsu” sound 😉 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  13. itsacrazycatladything

    Hi Paul please accept my apologies for taking so long to workout how to get to your blog. I feel a right twit, its easy when you know how lol. My excuse is I’m still in the learning phase, so please don’t judge me to harshly. I thought it was a great bio when I read it the first time on your Avatar page, I must say very impressive on the second reading. Hope you’ve had a good (hump) day, I always look forward to Wednesday just so I can say that…..its a crazy cat lady thing.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      Dear Crazycatlady,

      Hey, no problem. Very glad to hear from you. Thank you taking interest in my blog and I look forward to your post. I, too, am a lover of cats! 🙂
      And my your Wednesday be the best ever!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      Please allow me to apologize. I haven’t looked at my About page for a good while. And you are so correct. it’s one long harangue. Well, that’s my next WP project. I’ll definitely get to it and make it a bit more readable.
      I am grateful for the heads-up. Thank you Bees! Thank you.

      Like

      Reply
    2. Paul Post author

      Again thank you for that heads-up. I’ve done the edit and my About Page is much more readable. You were absolutely right. 🙂

      Again thanks,

      Like

      Reply
  14. Smitha V

    Hi Paul,
    It’s great to get to know you. I am glad you wrote such a detailed ‘about’ page. It’s informative and helpful – the part which talks about your teachers – the grade 5 who brought out the best in you and the grade 6 who destroyed your confidence. It’s amazing what an important role teachers’ play in our life and sad that they have the power to destroy. You’ve had such an amazingly, interesting, chequered life and through it all you carried on learning and teaching others. Wow! Truly inspired by you. Thank you for sharing this with us.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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